Studies

Sub-Studies

IMAGINE brings together gastroenterologists, neuroscientists and psychiatrists, currently working in isolated silos, into a network focused on:

  • defining the bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, and
  • how alterations of the gut microbiome may influence anxiety and depression associated with gastrointestinal disorders.

The overall aim of IMAGINE is to identify the key mechanisms in the diet-microbiome-host relationship and test novel therapies for treatment of IBS, IBD and associated psychiatric disorders.

1. Fecal Microbial Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis
This project will use antibiotic pre-treatments to see if the success of fecal microbial therapy (FMT) is improved in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).

Recruitment sites for this study:

McMaster University

Address: 1200 Main St. W. Hamilton, ON. L8S 4K1
Phone: 905-521-2100 x 73601
Lead: Dr. Paul Moayyedi
Contact: Melanie Wolfe

2. Fecal Microbial Therapy in Crohn’s Disease
This project will determine whether fecal microbial therapy (FMT) can improve symptoms in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD).

Recruitment sites for this study:

McMaster University

Address: 1200 Main St. W. Hamilton, ON. L8S 4K1
Phone: 905-521-2100 x 73601
Lead: Dr. Paul Moayyedi
Contact: Melanie Wolfe

University of Alberta

Address: 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3
Phone: TBD
Lead: Dr. Dina Kao
Contact: Brandi Roach

University of Calgary

Address: 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: TBD
Lead: Drs. Deborah Marshall & Gil Kaplan
Contact: Gurmeet Bindra

3. PET Imaging Study
This study will be brain scanning patients with IBD who are also clinically depressed to better understand how the two relate to each other.

Recruitment sites for this study:

McMaster University

Address: 1280 Main Street West Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1
Phone: 905-521-2100 x 73601
Lead Investigator: Paul Moayyedi
Contact: Melanie Wolfe

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

Address: 250 College Street, Room B26, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R8
Phone: 416-535-8501 x 33677
Lead Investigator: Jeff Meyer
Contact: Cynthia Xu

4. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Mental Health
Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in people diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with depression rates almost twice as high for those with IBD compared to the general community, and an estimated 20% overall with depression or anxiety. Perceived stress is a factor in the development of anxiety and depression. These comorbid conditions complicate management of IBD, adversely impacting patient outcomes and health, and increasing the resource burden to the health care system. However, comorbid depression and anxiety in IBD patients is undertreated, paralleling unmet mental health treatment needs in the general Canadian population. Development of alternate modes of effective treatment delivery is vital to enhance access, given limited mental health service availability. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has strong clinical evidence for its effectiveness in treating episodes of depression and anxiety as well as in preventing relapses. There is some evidence that CBT can be successfully delivered as an internet-based intervention. While there are limited data on the efficacy of CBT tailored to the IBD population, studies targeting comorbid depression in IBD have resulted in significant mental health improvement. A recent study implementing an internet-based CBT program for IBD reported modest outcomes, but participants were not selected to have psychiatric comorbidity and the primary outcomes were not improvement in mood or anxiety symptoms.

The internet-based program used in this study will involve brief modules focused on areas important in managing stress, anxiety and depression including.

Recruitment sites for this study:

University of Manitoba

Address: 66 Chancellors Cir, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2
Phone: TBD
Lead: Dr. Charles Bernstein
Contact: TBD
www.ibdmanitoba.org

5. Low FODMAPS Diet in Irritable Bowel Syndrome
This project will determine whether a low FODMAP diet can improve symptoms in IBS patients

Recruitment sites for this study:

Queen's University

Address: 99 University Ave, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Phone: TBD
Lead: Dr. Stephen Vanner
Contact: TBD

6. Patient Preferences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatments
This study will help us understand what is important to people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when choosing between treatments.

Eligibility Criteria: You are eligible to participate in the “Patient Preferences for Ulcerative Colitis Treatments” sub-study if you fulfill the following criteria:
– Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC)
– At least 18 years of age
– Able to answer an English web-based survey

*Please note: Currently, we are only recruiting subjects that are residents of Alberta or Manitoba and enrolled in the IMAGINE main cohort study (MInd and Gut Interactions Cohort (MAGIC)).

 

Recruitment sites for this study:

University of Calgary

Address: 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4
Phone: TBD
Lead: Drs. Deborah Marshall & Gil Kaplan
Contact: Brittany Shewchuk

7. Stress reduction in IBD
This study will use an online stress reduction program to help people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) identify and manage stressors. More information can be found at: www.wellnesstoolbox.ca/intro

Recruitment sites for this study:

University of Alberta

Address: 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3
Phone: TBD
Lead: Puneeta Tandon
Contact: Puneeta Tandon